World Campus Courses

The ACTS World Campus lets you learn from wherever you are so you can earn a graduate certificate after just four courses and an MA degree 8 weeks at a time. Access quality education to equip you for God’s service while you continue to serve in your current life context.

A graduate certificate in Biblical Foundations, Christian Foundations or Ministry Foundations will accelerate your growth or give you a jump start on our MA or MDiv programs.

All World Campus courses are delivered online in an 8-week format. Available course options are listed below and arranged by study topic.

BIB 505 OL – Biblical Hermeneutics

Don (Dongshin) Chang, PhD
Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies

This course will focus on the development of a systematic approach to the interpretation of Scripture. While various critical-interpretative systems and strategies will be considered, special attention will be given to the historical-grammatical method. The predominant literary genres of the Bible will be examined and relevant principles of interpretation highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the original, intended meaning of Scripture in its canonical context as the basis upon which to prepare expositions and make appropriate contemporary applications.

BIB 520/620 OL – Old Testament Foundations

Rob Hiebert, PhD
Professor of Old Testament

This course will involve an introductory survey of the books of the Old Testament as part of a narrative theological investigation of this “first testament” for the Christian. It will include the study of key passages and theological themes, and practical experience in doing Old Testament theology.

Note: while the instructional teaching for BIB 520 and BIB 620 is the same, there is a different syllabus for each course.

BIB 632 OL – Exposition of Matthew

Larry Perkins, PhD
Professor of Biblical Studies

An examination of Matthew’s message concerning the significance of Jesus Messiah and his new assembly. We must naturally come to terms with much of Jesus’ teaching in this exposition, but we will attempt to determine as well how Matthew understood the theological framework within which Jesus ministered. We will also pay attention to the many references to the Old Testament within this Gospel. By doing this, we seek to understand how Matthew’s articulation of Jesus as Messiah continues to have relevance for us in the twenty-first century.

BOT 692 OL – OT Leadership and Spiritual Formation

Mark Wessner, PhD
Associate Professor of Biblical Studies for Leadership

The Old Testament themes of leadership and spiritual formation are expressed in and through the history, activities, beliefs and teachings of the first followers of God, from scattered individuals to a unified socio-political state. In terms of spiritual formation, this course explores the nature of personal “face to face” encounters/relationships with the divine. In terms of leadership, the life and leadership of various “unequaled” Old Testament leaders will be examined. Throughout the course, participants will explore specific theological and practical frameworks to evaluate their own spiritual health and ministry leadership.

BOT 622 OL – Interpretation of Exodus

Larry Perkins, PhD
Professor of Biblical Studies

An overview of the second book of the Bible and careful analysis of selected passages. Relevant hermeneutical issues are highlighted, key themes are investigated, and the enduring significance of this covenantally and vocationally significant book is explored.

CLD 510 OL – Foundations of Christian Leadership

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies & Practical Theology

This course provides learners with a biblical perspective on six key dimensions of leadership: a growing relationship with God, character, calling, community, team and context-appropriate competencies. In addition to working through attributes of their personal calling, learners will also engage with Scripture, form their own Rule of Life and personal development plan, and develop their own theology of leadership. CLD 510 helps learners strengthen their leadership foundations and is the prerequisite entry course to the CLD track.

CLD 531 OL – Theology & Practice of Leadership

Roger Helland, DMin
Adjunct Professor

Christian servant and shepherd leaders must nurture their inner spiritual life as well as cultivate good outward leadership skills. While we can learn from secular or natural leadership sources, we must first establish the practices of spiritual leadership from biblical theology. We must learn how Christian spirituality and leadership interact. In this course, we will seek to articulate a biblical theology of spiritual leadership and its passionate practice. Effective Christian leaders require spiritual resources and practices that will cultivate, guide, and empower the personal, corporate, and missional dimensions of their leadership.

CLD 532 OL – Power, Change and Conflict

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies & Practical Theology

Power relationships and the need for change exist in all organizations. Change often upsets delicate power balances and can result in conflict. As organizations attempt to respond to change, leaders must understand the role of power in the change process and how to mobilize the power of leadership in a healthy and godly manner. Conflict can arise for many reasons, but often accompanies the transitions that result from change. Few interpersonal exchanges have as much catalytic potential for good as healthy conflict. By addressing and transforming their conflicts, individuals and groups of people develop an internal rigor, enhance mutual understanding, sharpen their mandates and deal proactively with important issues in their lives.

CLD 533 OL – Mentoring, Team Building and Equipping

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies & Practical Theology

The era of the do-it-all “super-leader” is over. While leading remains a prerequisite to effective oversight of a ministry, equipping, mentoring, and team-building are the means by which effective leading occurs. Equipping has to do with ensuring that believers gain capacity and skills that help them live out their calling. Mentoring has to do with modelling Christ-likeness, building relationships that encourage and challenge, and helping people take next steps. Team-building focuses on building a strong sense of community and helping people function well together. The legacy of a leader is largely determined by the degree to which that individual effectively equips, mentors, and builds people into a cohesive team.

CLD 534 OL – Vision & Strategic Planning

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies & Practical Theology

This course provides Christian leaders with a biblical perspective on planning within ministry organizations, an understanding of ministry governance models, the skills to develop a shared vision for ministry, and a set of practical planning tools for making progress towards that vision.

CHM 508 OL – Small Groups in the Church

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies & Practical Theology

This course focuses on helping you to develop the practical skills necessary for effective and vibrant small group ministry. Over the eight weeks of the course, you will gain contemporary insights related to small group dynamics and the organization of a small group ministry in the church. You will answer questions like what makes small groups grow? Or, what are the essential skills necessary to lead and shepherd small group ministry? Join Dr. Randy Wollf as he unpacks these skills to help you cast vision, build a team, and grow your small group ministry in your church.

CHM 596 OL – Building Healthy Boards

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies & Practical Theology

This course provides key insights into how to build a healthy ministry board. The topics were selected based on a survey of denominational leaders, pastors and other ministry leaders. They were asked to imagine that they were able to bring together many of the church boards in their denomination for a day of training and recommended key topics that they would want to see covered. Several training themes emerged in their recommendations: models of ministry governance, team-building, discerning God’s will together, spiritual leadership, board member training, managing conflict, leading meetings, financial management, visionary thinking and strategic planning, and dealing with paid staff. This course will equip you in these areas so that you can serve well on a ministry board and help the board function more effectively.

CHM 595 OL – Managing Volunteers

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies & Practical Theology

This course will help you sharpen skills related to recruiting and serving volunteers. Specifically, you will learn how to help volunteers live out their calling with excellence and a deep sense of fulfillment while making an important contribution to the ministry or program in which they volunteer.

In addition, the course will help you understand and utilize key concepts and practices related to managing volunteers. You will assess the volunteer practices of a ministry, program or organization (preferably the one in which you currently serve) and you will explore and discuss books and other materials that describe some of the qualities and common characteristics of volunteers. This information will help you grow in your understanding of what motivates (and releases) people to volunteer.

PTH 603 OL – Preaching and Communication

Kenton Anderson, PhD
Adjunct Professor

This course equips the student to prepare and deliver expository sermons with in-class preaching and evaluation. Videotape feedback will form a major component of evaluation.

PTH 600 OL – Pastoral Formation

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Practical Theology

This course deals with the theology and methodology of pastoral formation. It is designed to help shape the student into an effective biblical pastor – a pastoral team member and leader who can be used of God to help produce spiritual formation and leadership development. It seeks to further the pastoral formation process by immersing the student in biblical principles of pastoral ministry and applying those principles to the calling of pastorship within contemporary culture.

CHP 630 OL – Foundations of Chaplaincy

Gloria Woodland, DMin
Assistant Professor of Chaplaincy

One of two foundational chaplaincy/spiritual care courses, designed to help students understand how the contemporary practice of chaplaincy integrates lessons from the human and behavioral sciences with the pastoral practice of chaplaincy as rooted in the disciplines of biblical and theological studies. Students will be challenged to consider how pastoral practice is responsibly informed by biblical, theological and traditional perspectives. Concepts of hope, community and compassion will be examined. Since the ministry of the professional chaplain occurs in pluralistic society, a course emphasis will be on how to carry an evangelical imperative in a public ministry context.

PTH 613 OL – Evangelism & Faith Formation

Randy Wollf, PhD
Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Practical Theology

This course focuses on helping students develop an incarnational and prayerful approach to making disciples where they journey with people as Jesus’ representatives and spokespeople. It will enable students to increasingly view ministry in a missional way while growing a passion for and developing skills in helping people follow Jesus within vibrant faith communities. We will look at personal and collaborative approaches to incarnational living and disciple-making. The class will also help students understand how we can effectively live as Christ’s ambassadors in the Canadian context with consideration given to the plurality of faiths and cultures in our cultural mosaic.

PTH 605 OL – Pastoral Counselling

Gloria Woodland, DMin
Assistant Professor of Chaplaincy

This class explores pastoral counseling in the context of pastoral care from a family systems perspective. It aims to integrate pastoral counseling as part of shepherding a congregation. Included are training in empathetic listening and reflection skills, an overview of key issues and topics (i.e., suicide prevention, crisis intervention, ethics, domestic violence and child abuse), training in premarital counseling and assessment, and a survey of common mental disorders encountered by pastors (i.e., depression, stress/anxiety, substance abuse, chronic mental illness). The course includes a substantial experiential component, including skills practice, and personal and systemic theological reflection about our beliefs, family relationships, and emotional health in the Church.

THS 571 OL – Theology I

Brian Cooper, PhD
Associate Professor of Theology

One of three introductory systematic theology courses, this class lays a foundation for theological study and reflection in all degree and certificate programs. We will begin with a discussion of the nature and importance of theology and a review of key tools and methodological principles for the Christian thinker. We will also reflect on the particular dynamics of doing theology in the Evangelical and Believers’ Church tradition. As an illustration of good theological reflection in action, we will explore the doctrines of revelation and Scripture, which are basic to our work.

Note: this course is also taught by Dr. Archie Spencer (see below).

THS 671 OL – Theology II

Brian Cooper, PhD
Associate Professor of Theology

One of three introductory systematic theology courses, this class examines the Bible’s story of creation, fall, and redemption. This course begins with the existence and nature of God, especially focusing on God’s action in creation and providence. Discussion then moves to the nature of human beings as creatures and sinners, culminating in a consideration of the person of God the Redeemer.

THS 672 OL – Theology III

Brian Cooper, PhD
Associate Professor of Theology

One of three introductory systematic theology courses, this class continues to unfold the Bible’s story of creation, fall, and redemption. Special attention will be given to the work of the Lord Jesus Christ as well as the person and work of the Holy Spirit and the application of Christ’s work to the believer by the Holy Spirit. The course concludes with a study of last things in relation to individuals and future things.

THS 571 OL – Theology I

Archie Spencer, ThD
Professor of Theology

One of three introductory systematic theology courses, this class lays a foundation for theological study and reflection in all degree and certificate programs. We will begin with a discussion of the nature and importance of theology and a review of key tools and methodological principles for the Christian thinker. We will also reflect on the particular dynamics of doing theology in the Evangelical and Believers’ Church tradition. As an illustration of good theological reflection in action, we will explore the doctrines of revelation and Scripture, which are basic to our work.

Note: this course is also taught by Dr. Brian Cooper (see above).

THS 602 OL – Christian Ethics

Michael Morelli, PhD
Assistant Professor of Theology, Culture and Ethics

This course consists of a study of the biblical principles, theological foundations, philosophical conceptions and resulting methodological procedures which inform Christian moral decision making in the social and individual human situation. It also investigates moral attitude and action as they apply in the specific areas of individual and social ethics, which are critical for our culture today.

THS 680 OL – Christianity and Culture

Bruce Guenther, PhD
Professor of Church History and Mennonite Studies

The relationship between Christians and culture in North America is variegated, prompting leaders such as Tim Keller to state, “The relationship of Christians to culture is the singular current crisis point for the church.” The course will help Christians understand and interpret culture. It is about understanding the ongoing relationship between Christianity and culture, and how cultural awareness along with critical skills for critiquing culture from a Christian perspective enhances ministry and leadership effectiveness both in the church and within society at large. The first half of the course lays the biblical, theological and historical foundations for a Christian understanding of culture, while the second half of the course is a more practical exploration of specific spheres of culture. The seminar-style course will feature an interdisciplinary range of lectures, readings, and group activities and discussions.

HIS 540 OL – History of Christianity

Bruce Guenther, PhD
Professor of Church History & Mennonite Studies

This course provides a chronological survey of the history of Christianity from the first century until the eve of the Reformation. Our study is concerned not only with ecclesiastical organization and practice but also with the history of theology, mission and spirituality, and the various social, political and theological influences that have shaped the changing relationship between Christianity and culture.

HIS 541 OL – History of Christianity II

Brian Cooper, PhD
Associate Professor of Theology

This course examines issues and movements in the history of western Christianity from the Reformation to the present. To understand both the developments within the church, and the many relationships between Christianity and western culture, attention is given to theological developments, church-state issues, changes and continuities in Catholicism and Protestantism, the impact of nationalism and the Enlightenment, and the modern missionary movement.

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